Key Stage 2

Investigate the Anglo-Saxons – ideal for years 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 & 8

Primary Aims:

  • To provide support for schools studying the QCA Unit 6B: “Why have people invaded and settled in Britain in the past?” An Anglo-Saxon case study.
  • To offer a local alternative for studying the Anglo-Saxons by using material from the archaeological cemetery site at Butler’s Field, Lechlade, Gloucestershire. This is particularly useful for schools that are unable to visit the British Museum, where the Sutton Hoo treasure is exhibited
  • To find out that there are some things we can learn, and some we cannot, from archaeological remains
  • To make deductions about who the grave commemorated To find out more about the Anglo-Saxon way of life.

Secondary Aims:

  • To provide an opportunity for children at KS2 to explore history through primary evidence
  • To provide an opportunity for the development of cross-curricula links
  • To encourage the interpretation of a variety of historical material
  • To provide an opportunity for KS2 children to develop and use appropriate vocabulary
  • To promote the Cotswold Museum Service’s collections and education resources.

Structure of the Session in 4 groups:

  • Introductory Talk (10 mins)
    Background to the archaeological site and explanation of the activities involved in the session.
  • Stage 1 (10 mins)
    The children will be split into 4 groups and given a set of replica grave goods from the graves at Butler’s Field, Lechlade. From the objects alone, they will try to discover what sort of person was buried in the grave.
  • Stage 2 (10 mins)
    The children will then be given information on the skeleton buried in their grave. From the additional information they will reconsider what sort of person was buried with the objects.
  • Stage 3 (20 mins)
    The children will compare their answers with the overall evidence from the archaeological site report to see whether they were right or not. They will also be able to explore the process of burial by dressing up one person from their group in Anglo-Saxon clothes and arranging the objects around them as would have been done in Anglo- Saxon times.
  • Plenary (10 mins)
    A summary of what the children have learnt will be given.

Learning Objectives:

  • To ask and answer questions about an archaeological site
  • To show knowledge and understanding of an Anglo-Saxon grave and what it reveals about the beliefs and the Saxon way of life in Britain
  • To know one or more aspects of life in Anglo-Saxon Britain
  • To know that an event can be interpreted in different ways
  • To present information they have researched
  • To use terminology appropriate to the period To use dates relating to the Anglo-Saxon period.

Cross-curricula links:

In addition to the primary focus of history, all the activities provide cross-curricula links. These include: Literacy, numeracy, design and technology, PSHE, art and geography.

Everyday Life of the Romans – ideal for years 3, 4 & 5

Primary Aim:

To provide support for schools studying the QCA Unit 6A: ‘Why have people invaded and settled in Britain in the past? A Roman case study.

Secondary Aims:

  • To provide an opportunity for children at KS2 to explore history through primary evidence.
  • To provide an opportunity for the development of cross-curricula links.
  • To encourage the interpretation of a variety of historical material.
  • To provide an opportunity for KS2 children to develop and use appropriate vocabulary.
  • To provide an opportunity for a local study of Roman remains.
  • To promote the Cotswold Museum Service’s collections and education resources.

Structure of the Session: in 4 groups on rotation

  • Introductory Talk (10 mins)
    An introduction to the session.
  • Making Mosaics (10 mins)
    Look at real tesserae and re-create geometric patterns found in mosaics using replica tiles.
  • What’s Cooking? (10 mins)
    Explore Roman cooking through a range of replica cooking vessels and utensils. Find out what food the Romans ate and examine real Roman pottery.
  • What Not To Wear! (10 mins)
    Dress up as a Roman and look at real Roman jewellery.
  • Fun and games (10 mins)
    Have a go at playing some popular Roman games.
  • Plenary (10 mins)
    What did you learn?

Learning Outcomes:

  • To select and present relevant information to show an understanding of the impact of Roman settlement on Britain.
  • To show an understanding of primary and secondary evidence.
  • To demonstrate an awareness that Romans lived a long time ago.
  • To show an understanding of associated words and phrases.

Cross-curricula links:

In addition to the primary focus of history, all the activities provide cross-curricula links. These include: Literacy, numeracy, design and technology, PSHE, art and geography.

Through the Roman Keyhole – KS2 (Advanced) – ideal for years 5, 6, 7 & 8

Primary Aim:

To provide support for schools studying the QCA Unit 6A: ‘Why have people invaded and settled in Britain in the past? A Roman case study.

Secondary Aims:

  • To provide an opportunity for children at KS2 to explore history through primary evidence.
  • To provide an opportunity for the development of cross-curricula links.
  • To encourage the interpretation of a variety of historical material.
  • To provide an opportunity for KS2 children to develop and use appropriate vocabulary.
  • To provide an opportunity for a local study of Roman remains.
  • To promote the Cotswold Museum Service’s collections and education resources.

Structure of the Session in 4 groups:

  • Introductory Talk (10 mins)
    What will you do in the session?
  • Whose House? (20 mins)
    Look at real and replica Roman building materials, archaeology plans, drawings and photographs to work out what sort of house it is.
  • Whose objects? (20 mins)
    Explore replica Roman objects to discover who might have lived in the house.
  • Plenary (10 mins)
    What did you learn?

Learning Outcomes:

  • To select and present relevant information to show an understanding of the impact of Roman settlement on Britain.
  • To show an understanding of primary and secondary evidence.
  • To demonstrate awareness that Romans lived a long time ago.
  • To show an understanding of associated words and phrases.

Cross-curricula links:

In addition to the primary focus of history, all the activities provide cross-curricula links. These include: Literacy, numeracy, design and technology, PSHE, art and geography.